Karen Buck

Working tirelessly for Westminster North

News

Dear Constituent

While I support the principles behind TTIP - the free trade agreement that is currently being negotiated between the USA and the EU - as it has huge potential to create jobs, improve wages and deliver a better deal for consumers. It is also supported by the TUC, the CBI and many consumer groups and would strengthen the trade relationship between our two most important markets. (These negotiations also show once again how important our membership of the EU is for British trade, businesses and consumers and that the UK's national interest lies at the heart of a reformed EU). It is crucial, though that:

. the benefits of TTIP filter down to employees, small businesses and consumers,
. that the deal is open and accountable,
. that it respects environmental concerns
and that national Governments can still act in their own interests.

I also share the concerns that many constituents have raised about the impact that TTIP could have on public services - particularly the NHS - which would potentially allow investors to bring proceedings against any foreign government that signs the treaty.

I believe that the NHS and all public services need to be more, not less, integrated and I am concerned that including public services in the final TTIP could increase the fragmentation of health services that is already taking place under this Government. That is why I believe that the NHS and public services should not be included in any final TTIP agreement.

I also have wider concerns about the Government's recent changes to the NHS, which have increased competition and fragmentation in one of our most cherished public services. That is why I opposed these changes when they were debated in Parliament and why I welcome the commitment by the Shadow Frontbench that a future Labour Government would repeal the current Government's 2012 Health and Social Care Act.

I hope that the Government listen to these very serious concerns and ensure that this agreement can deliver real benefits for UK jobs, businesses, workers and consumers.

Yours sincerely

Karen Buck MP

My response on the TTIP Negotiations

Dear Constituent While I support the principles behind TTIP - the free trade agreement that is currently being negotiated between the USA and the EU - as it has huge...

Thank you for getting in touch with me about the Government's proposed legislation on the recall of MPs.

Labour supports the principle of recall, and included this in our 2010 General Election Manifesto. The Government has now committed to bring forward a Bill, and although this is late in the day, in the fifth year of Parliament, it is still welcomed.

We are now waiting for the details of their Bill, setting out how it would work in practice.

However, I would make two key points:

First, I am not in favour of a rerun of the proposals contained in Nick Clegg's draft Bill. This would have seen the recall process in the hands of Members of Parliament. There is a real risk that such a system will be seen as the political establishment closing ranks on the behaviour of a fellow politician and could lose the confidence of the public.

Second, any system of recall needs to be designed to avoid powerful vested interests kicking out MPs where no wrongdoing has happened simply because they dislike the way a politician has voted on controversial issues.
Recall could play an important role in giving people more confidence in the Parliamentary system, but we have to get the detail right. That's why we'll be closely studying the Government's plans as and when they are published.

I hope this is helpful and thank you again for writing.

Yours sincerely

Karen Buck MP

My response on the recall of MP'S

Thank you for getting in touch with me about the Government's proposed legislation on the recall of MPs. Labour supports the principle of recall, and included this in our 2010...

Dear Constituent

Thank you for contacting me on the issue of shale gas extraction and the government's announcement in the Queen's Speech.

We face three critical challenges, which we have to reconcile: ensuring a safe and secure energy supply; protecting our local environment against the risks of damaging exploitation and protecting our global environment against the threat of climate change.

Let me start with the first and last points before explaining what I think our safeguards should be.

Gas is a fuel which remains vital to the operation of our homes, services and businesses in the UK. 80% of our homes rely on gas for heating, while around 30% of our electricity comes from gas fired power stations. While low carbon power generation will reduce our reliance on fossil fuels over time, we will still need flexible power to help manage peaks in demand. Projections from National Grid expect gas continuing to play a vital role in our energy system for many years to come.

While demand for gas continues to be high, our ability to source this fuel from within our own borders has been steadily declining. In 2004, the UK became a net importer of gas for the first time since North Sea extraction began. For those reasons, the possibility to source gas from the UK should not be ruled out without careful consideration.

Importantly, ensuring a domestic gas supply does not conflict with the critical task of de-carbonising the power sector. I am wholly committed to the development of renewable power generation. The Labour Party has pledged to continue with the implementation of the ‘Contracts for Difference' mechanism to stimulate investment in renewables and low carbon generation, and has committed to a 2030 target for the effective decarbonisation of our power sector. The Committee on Climate Change has also said that shale gas could be developed in the UK within our legally binding carbon budgets. Within that framework, fracking is unlikely to lead to an increase in the total amount of fossil fuel burnt for electricity generation- it is more an issue of where that supply comes from.

So if we need to maintain a gas supply from secure sources, and should not rule out shale gas extraction from the mix, but what safeguards need to be in place?

I am clear that shale gas extraction should only go ahead in the context of robust regulation, comprehensive monitoring and strict enforcement, and in a way which is consistent with decarbonising our electricity supply by 2030.

The Government's Infrastructure Bill proposes changes to the regulations on fracking for shale gas.

Conventional oil and gas exploration and production mostly involves vertical or near-vertical drilling from one spot at the surface. A well for shale gas, however, will usually run vertically down and then extend horizontally for some distance - this could be as much as 2 miles, or even more. This would mean that companies would have to seek permission from a large number of landowners. As it stands, existing legislation allows coalmining, water, sewage and gas transportation pipelines to have underground access without needing the permission of the landowner, but it does not allow shale gas or deep geothermal development. In reality without bringing shale gas extraction legislation into line with that covering coalmining would provide an effective block on fracking activity and deep geothermal in the UK.

At the end of May the government published consultation on its proposed changes to trespass regulations and confirmed their intention to legislate in the forthcoming Infrastructure Bill. These changes will mean that while shale gas companies will still need the permission of landowners for surface access and still require local planning consent, underpinned by environmental impact assessments, they will not need permission for underground access at depths of 300m or more. I therefore do not oppose these reforms. However, the issue of underground access rights is separate from the environmental and safety framework. Only by fully addressing legitimate environmental and safety concerns about fracking with robust regulation, comprehensive monitoring and strict enforcement will people have confidence that the exploration and possible extraction of shale gas is a safe and reliable source that can contribute to the UK's energy mix.

I am therefore determined that we should push for the environmental framework to be strengthened. In 2012 Labour set out six tough environmental conditions which should be in place prior to any shale gas extraction taking place in the UK.

We said:

• Evidence of seismic activity led to the suspension of operations in Lancashire in 2011. As Labour set out in an article for Business Green on 7 March 2012, baseline conditions should be assessed prior to any exploratory work with micro-seismic monitoring, in order to discriminate natural from artificially induced seismic events once the drilling begins. An early warning detection system should also be implemented, similar to that used in the Netherlands and Germany, which would allow measures to be taken before seismic activity has a noticeable impact.

• There has been a lack of transparency and control in the USA on exactly what is being used to fracture shale rocks and extract the resulting gas. In the UK, the chemicals used must be restricted to those that are proven to be non-hazardous. Further, there should be mandated disclosure of all the chemicals to be used in fracking, including their toxicity levels.

• The integrity of each shale gas well must be assured to prevent water contamination. An independent assessment of the well design, the cement bond between the casing and well bore, in addition to the composition of the casing to determine its ability to resist corrosion, is essential.

• The level of methane in groundwater should also be assessed prior to any drilling. Methane can occur naturally in groundwater, but there is concern from the experience in the USA that it may also occur as a result of fracking. In each case, that needs to be assessed prior to any activity, so that there is robust baseline information to monitor against.

• All potential shale exploration sites should be subject to screening for an environmental impact assessment - at present, those below one hectare do not need to undertake such an assessment. This assessment should include the amount of water used, how much can then be recycled and the general availability of water in each case.

• All of the monitoring activity referred to above should take place over a twelve month period, to allow sufficient time to gather all of the evidence required to make an informed decision on whether to proceed with exploration


While the government accepted four of the six conditions in December 2012, we still believe that the regulatory framework is not sufficiently robust. It is not currently agreed clear that the level of methane in groundwater should be assessed prior to any drilling. Methane can occur naturally in groundwater, so it is important that robust baseline information exists to monitors activity against. Neither has it been agreed that all monitoring activity should take place over at least a twelve month period, to allow sufficient time to gather all of the evidence required to make an informed decision on whether to proceed with exploration. I will continue to push for the environmental framework to be strengthened in these areas and for assurances that the responsibility for clean-up costs and liability for any untoward consequences rests fairly and squarely with the industry and not with the public purse or with homeowners. Many other concerns remain, particularly regarding the effectiveness of the monitoring process and the capacity of the relevant bodies to undertake that monitoring and enforce the regulations, and these must also be addressed.

I hope this is helpful and thank you for taking the time to write to me on this important issue.

Yours sincerely,

Karen Buck MP

 

My response to Fracking

Dear Constituent Thank you for contacting me on the issue of shale gas extraction and the government's announcement in the Queen's Speech. We face three critical challenges, which we have...

Imperial NHS Trust respond to my concerns about West London A&E capacity

https://www.scribd.com/doc/230407506/Response-from-Imperial

Dear Resident

May 2014

Plans to re-develop the Warwick need improving,especially to offer more hope for local people in housing need

It is now only a very few short weeks before you will be asked to vote on Westminster Council's plans for the Warwick estate. After this one vote, there will be a major development of the area, which will have both good points and disadvantages. However, you will not be voting again on the individual parts of the scheme, so I think it is very important to get the best possible deal now.

Having been out speaking to even more residents recently, I remain concerned that many people are still not clear about the plans and what they will mean, nor that the Council is offering the best deal on affordable housing.

• On the one hand, there will be real improvements to the look of the area, with some new low-cost homes, and job opportunities and community benefits

• On the other hand, out of the 290 or so additional homes to be built primarily around the Harrow Road end of the Warwick, the vast majority will be for high-cost private sale, greatly increasing density, and involving around 5-6 years of building work in the area.

I estimate that only about 6 in every 100 households currently living in the Warwick Masterplan area would benefit from new affordable housing opportunities.

I have met with Westminster Council officers again to press the vital importance of making more homes truly affordable to rent and to buy, to help the many people on the Warwick who are in housing need. I have now written to them with a list of key points that have to be dealt with before the vote.

These should include a promise to at least re-house all those Warwick households currently registered as over-crowded. In addition, all the planned ‘intermediate' housing (that costs less than the full ‘market' cost but is dearer than council housing) should have rent levels that are within reach of local people who would benefit from it. At present only half will be available for households with incomes of between
£30-37,000 a year, with the rest aimed at a range of higher earners. With house prices increasing very fast, I am confident that the private home sales should make more profit to put back into increasing the amount of affordable housing, and have asked for further assessments of this.

I have also pressed Westminster on the guaranteed minimum money that will come back into the community for improved local services, and I want to see complete frankness about what the Council can guarantee (such as affordable housing) and what they can ASK for from private companies, without any guarantee (such as a supermarket).

Developments like this can greatly improve an area- but the offer to local people must be a good one.

I continue to welcome your views.

Yours sincerely

Karen Buck MP

 

Warwick resident’s re-development letter

Dear Resident May 2014Plans to re-develop the Warwick need improving,especially to offer more hope for local people in housing needIt is now only a very few short weeks before you...

Rough sleepers to lose their beds as West End hostels are closed due to cuts

More than 50 rough sleepers will lose their beds in central London when two hostels shut after their grants were cut by Westminster City Council. Despite figures showing homelessness in London is rising, Conservative-run Westminster said not enough people were using the hostels and the buildings were in poor condition. A Westminster City Council spokesperson said: "We have reviewed our hostels to ensure we provide services that are needed and help people move towards independent accommodation."

http://www.standard.co.uk/news/london/rough-sleepers-to-lose-their-beds-as-west-end-hostels-are-closed-due-to-cuts-9406757.html

Green light for Westminster luxury flats

An office block within walking distance of Downing Street and the Houses of Parliament is set to be turned into a series of luxury flats after the scheme was granted planning by Westminster City Council. The former European Council for Foreign Relations building at 29-35 Old Queen Street is set to undergo a £100m renovation to turn it into 22 super-luxury apartments complete with rooftop gardens.

http://www.building.co.uk/news/green-light-for-westminster-luxury-flats/5068611.article

The two faces of Westminster

Rough sleepers to lose their beds as West End hostels are closed due to cuts More than 50 rough sleepers will lose their beds in central London when two hostels...

Kris Hopkins MP
the Department of Communities and Local Government
Eland House
Bressenden Place
London
SW1E 5DU

03 April 2014

Dear Mr Hopkins

RE: Review of Property Conditions in the Private Rented Sector, Question 22

I have been contacted by the Westminster Amenity Societies Forum, a group representing all the officially recognised residents' associations in the City of Westminster, about your forthcoming Review of Property Conditions in the Private Rented Sector.

In particular, the WASF have drawn my attention to Question 22, which raises the possibility of relaxing the London specific rules on letting residential property on a short term basis. As we are at the heart of London's tourist economy, unauthorised short term lets are a growing problem in Westminster.

Long term residents report feelings of loss of privacy and amenity of their own homes, anti-social behaviour and noise and other unneighbourly behaviour such as dumped rubbish. In several cases, local councillors have felt that the issue has become so much of a problem in their wards that they have allocated funds from their localised ward budgets to support Planning Enforcement Teams.

You will of course be aware that London, and Westminster in particular, also faces a serious housing shortage. Clearing the way for property owners to rent their flats out to tourists or business travellers, rather than long term tenants, will do nothing to alleviate this shortage and could well make it even harder for my constituents to find local accommodation in the private rented sector.

I would reiterate my constituents concern that the relevant provisions of the Greater London Powers Act 1973 not be updated, as least in so far as they apply to Inner London. I would appreciate your comments on this and on the contents of the attached letter.

Please respond in a way that I can copy to my constituent. Thank you for your assistance.

Yours sincerely

Karen Buck MP

Preventing Short Term Letting

Kris Hopkins MPthe Department of Communities and Local GovernmentEland HouseBressenden PlaceLondonSW1E 5DU 03 April 2014 Dear Mr Hopkins RE: Review of Property Conditions in the Private Rented Sector, Question 22...

Sir David Higgins
High Speed Two Ltd.,
2nd floor, Elland House,
Bressenden Place
London
SW1E 5 DU


30 April 2014


Dear Sir David

High Speed Rail (London-West Midlands) Bill (HS2 Hybrid Bill)

Following on from the successful passage of the second reading of HS2 Hybrid Bill , I write to ask that High Speed Two Ltd. ( HS2 Ltd. ) now answer the questions and suggestions made by Westminster and Brent Borough Councils and by a number of my well informed constituents as to the route and development of the new rail line as it impacts upon Westminster North .
A number of organisations and individuals have complained to me that HS2 Ltd. appear to have adopted a tactic of simply not answering questions raised by parties who believe themselves to be affected by the plans to construct the new railway. Such a tactic I believe to be counter productive (in that it creates unwarranted concerns and suspicions) and is profoundly undemocratic.

The major concerns that I share with the Councils and my constituents include :

1/ Why has there been no response to the proposal that the tunnel route as it passes through my Constituency be moved underneath the existing West Coast Main Line (WCML ) so that it avoids passing under the residential Queens Park Estate ? To date this proposal has just been ignored even though a similar section of tunnel between the Euston tunnel portal and the Adelaide Road Vent has since the publication of the draft ES been moved beneath the WCML "to reduce the effect on properties and structures which may be affected by settlement".

2/ The Councils and a number of my constituents believe that there are better locations to cite the proposed Salusbury Road Ventilation shaft and auto-transformer station which have grown to unacceptable size and prominence as the scheme has progressed. Again there appears to have been no response at all to a number of alternative and less intrusive sites. If there are substantive reasons as to why the shaft has to be located at this particular location and to this scale then it is now appropriate that the reasons be detailed.

3/ Westminster City Council is concerned that HS2 ventilation shafts need to be treated as
‘Scheduled Works' and therefore any subsequent changes to design and location be subject to further environmental impact assessments. This is of particular concern to Westminster because of their experience with Crossrail when changes to ventilation shafts were treated merely as ‘Ancillary Works' and therefore less amenable to local authority influence.

4/ I share the view that full use needs to be made of the proposed Old Oak Common interchange as the major southern terminus of the new line which will lessen the role of Euston and so avoid the wholesale demolition of Camden. I would like to see verification of the claim that Old Oak Common will actually be more accessible by public transport by the vast majority of Londoners and from most areas of London than Euston.

5/It is important to act quickly to specify the exact details of the route, the depth of tunnels and, construction methods so as to avoid ‘planning blight' in Westminster. I am pleased that the number of tunnels under my constituency has been reduced from three to two and it is my understanding that these tunnels will be at a depth of between 35 and 40 meters and bored through London clay. Therefore the Ministry and the HS2 Company are entirely confident that such construction will have no impact on properties above ground level and for this reason there are no proposals to offer any compensation to any of my constituents. It would therefore be appropriate for the DoT and for HS2 Ltd. to explicitly assure my constituents on these matters.

In responding to these points can the Ministry and HS2 Ltd. now set out a clear timetable as to when the questions that have already been submitted to them (especially Westminster City Council's submission of 27 February 2014) will actually be answered?

Please note that I am also writing today with the same concerns to the Department for Transport. Please respond in such a way as I can share your response with my constituents.

Yours sincerely

Karen Buck MP

 

Karen's Letter on HS2

Sir David Higgins High Speed Two Ltd., 2nd floor, Elland House, Bressenden Place London SW1E 5 DU 30 April 2014 Dear Sir David High Speed Rail (London-West Midlands) Bill (HS2...

I'm backing Westminster Amenity Societies Forum in opposing any Government moves to relax the rules to allow more short-term lets. Here's my letter to the Minister.

Kris Hopkins
Minister for Housing,
DCLG
Eland House
Bressenden Place
London SW1

Dear Kris,

I have been contacted by the association of the 18 amenity societies in Westminster to ask me to express their concern to you of the growing problem posed by short-term lets in the borough. As you may be aware, Westminster has the largest proportion of its housing stock in the private rented sector of any local authority in the country, so any changes impact disproportionately on us.

The amenity societies (and many individual residents) are strongly of the view that existing legislation should NOT be amended or relaxed in such a way as to encourage the further growth of the short-term rental sector. They are seeking assurances that the current consultation contained within your document "Review of Property Conditions in the Private Rented Sector" (Q22, Page 9) does not lead to any such relaxation in the legislation.

As they point out:

"Short-term letting is causing a major problem for some permanent residents in a number of amenity society areas, particularly in cases where short-term lets are regularly made. There can be real problems of anti-social behavior (and even intimidation), noise, refuse collection problems and similar. Furthermore, short-term lettings remove accommodation for long term lets".

I strongly support this view and trust that the government would not take these proposals further, to the detriment of longer-standing residents in all tenures, who overwhelmingly want both the peaceful enjoyment of their homes, and to live in neighbourhoods with some stability.

Thank you very much and I look forward to receiving your response.

Yours sincerely


Karen Buck MP

 

Opposition to any Government moves to relax the rules to allow more short-term lets

I'm backing Westminster Amenity Societies Forum in opposing any Government moves to relax the rules to allow more short-term lets. Here's my letter to the Minister. Kris HopkinsMinister for Housing,DCLGEland...


Dear resident,

I am concerned by a number of reports in the local area of a recent increase in both commercial and residential burglary, including a number of thefts of buggies and other items from the communal areas within blocks of flats.

The local police teams have been increasing patrols but I am very aware of the fact that this is probably not enough to increase their visibility sufficiently to provide reassurance- and this may have been true even before the reduction in size of our ward-based Safer Neighbourhood Teams.

I have, therefore, asked Westminster police to consider bringing in the mobile police station, to demonstrate an increased local police presence. I very much hope that this will be agreed soon.

Police are, additionally, advising people not to leave items, especially valuable items, in communal areas.

Here are some of the key points from my recent correspondence with police about these problems:

• " we are conducting targeted crime prevention patrols to the most burgled streets across the North Wards and this includes actively looking for open and vulnerable premises and highlighting them to the respective owners and landlords. For persistently vulnerable premises we also have to refer them to environmental health to take enforcement action around their communal security.

• We recently started Super Cocooning Non Residential Burglaries. Super Cocooning is an enhanced form of crime prevention combined with witness enquiries carried out after a premises has been the victim of a burglary. Door to door enquiries are carried out not only to establish if witnesses can be traced but also to alert other residents/business owners that a burglary has taken place.

• targeted patrols have been carried out around affected Wards over the last two weeks in addition to increased crime prevention visits including target hardening visits in conjunction with the local crime reduction officers."

The Maida Vale Safer Neighbourhood Police Team Number is: 07920233950.

Always dial 999 in an emergency, but use 101 to report crimes and other concerns that do not require an emergency response.

I hope that this is helpful.

Yours sincerely,

Karen Buck

 

Letter to residents regarding burglary’s in Maida Vale

Dear resident,I am concerned by a number of reports in the local area of a recent increase in both commercial and residential burglary, including a number of thefts of buggies...

The Labour Party will place cookies on your computer to help us make this website better. Please read this to review the updates about which cookies we use and what information we collect on our site.  To find out more about these cookies, see our privacy notice. Use of this site confirms your acceptance of these cookies.